consequentialism


con·se·quen·tial·ism

noun \-shə-ˌli-zəm\

Definition of CONSEQUENTIALISM

:  the theory that the value and especially the moral value of an act should be judged by the value of its consequences
con·se·quen·tial·ist \-ˌlist\ adjective or noun

First Known Use of CONSEQUENTIALISM

1982

consequentialism

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

In ethics, the doctrine that actions should be judged right or wrong on the basis of their consequences. The simplest form of consequentialism is classical (or hedonistic) utilitarianism, which asserts that an action is right or wrong according to whether it maximizes the net balance of pleasure over pain in the universe. The consequentialism of G.E. Moore, known as “ideal utilitarianism,” recognizes beauty and friendship, as well as pleasure, as intrinsic goods that one's actions should aim to maximize. According to the “preference utilitarianism” of R.M. Hare (1919–2002), actions are right if they maximize the satisfaction of preferences or desires, no matter what the preferences may be for. Consequentialists also differ over whether each individual action should be judged on the basis of its consequences or whether instead general rules of conduct should be judged in this way and individual actions judged only by whether they accord with a general rule. The former group are known as “act-utilitarians” and the latter as “rule-utilitarians.” See also deontological ethics.

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