catamaran


cat·a·ma·ran

noun \ˌka-tə-mə-ˈran, ˈka-tə-mə-ˌran\

: a boat with two hulls

Full Definition of CATAMARAN

:  a vessel (as a sailboat) with twin hulls and usually a deck or superstructure connecting the hulls

Illustration of CATAMARAN

Origin of CATAMARAN

Tamil kaṭṭumaram, from kaṭṭu to tie + maram tree, wood
First Known Use: 1673

Other Nautical Terms

avast, aweigh, flotsam, jib, keel, lee, port, starboard, stay

catamaran

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Twin-hulled sailing and engine-powered boat. Its design was based on a raft of two logs bridged by planks used by peoples in the Indonesian archipelago, Polynesia, and Micronesia. Up to 70 ft (21 m) long, early catamarans were paddled by many men and used for travel, in war, and in recreation. Especially after the sail was added, voyages as long as 2,000 mi (3,700 km) were made. In the 1870s they sailed so successfully against monohulled boats that they were barred from racing. The modern catamaran, which averages about 40 ft (12 m) in length, has been produced since 1950. They are very fast craft, achieving speeds of 20 mph (32 kph).

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