cascade

2 ENTRIES FOUND:

1cas·cade

noun \(ˌ)kas-ˈkād\

: a small, steep waterfall; especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls

: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down

: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

Full Definition of CASCADE

1
:  a steep usually small fall of water; especially :  one of a series
2
a :  something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding <blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade>
b :  a fall of material (as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line
3
:  something falling or rushing forth in quantity <a cascade of sound> <a cascade of events>

Examples of CASCADE

  1. Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.
  2. That decision set off a cascade of events.

Origin of CASCADE

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall
First Known Use: 1641

Related to CASCADE

Other Geology Terms

anthracite, boulder, cwm, erratic, igneous, intrusive, mesa, sedimentary, silt, swale

2cascade

verb

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cas·cad·edcas·cad·ing

Full Definition of CASCADE

intransitive verb
:  to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade
transitive verb
1
:  to cause to fall like a cascade
2
:  to connect in a cascade arrangement

Examples of CASCADE

  1. The water cascades over the rocks.
  2. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

First Known Use of CASCADE

1702

cas·cade

noun \(ˌ)kas-ˈkād\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of CASCADE

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage <a cascade of enzymatic reactions> <the cascade of events comprising the immune response>

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