Boethius


Bo·e·thi·us

biographical name \bō-ˈē-thē-əs\

Definition of BOETHIUS

Anicius Manlius Severinus ca 480–524 Rom. philos.

Boethius

biographical name    (Concise Encyclopedia)

(born AD 470–475?, Rome—died 524, Pavia?) Roman scholar, Christian philosopher, and statesman. Born to a patrician family, he became consul in 510 and subsequently chief minister to the Ostrogothic king Theodoric. Accused of treason and condemned to death, he wrote his Neoplatonic The Consolation of Philosophy while in prison awaiting execution. The work was extremely popular and influential through the Middle Ages and later. He is also known for his translations of works of Greek logic and mathematics, including those of Porphyry and Aristotle. His translations and commentaries were among the basic texts of medieval Scholasticism.

Variants of BOETHIUS

Boethius in full Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius

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