Quantcast
Merriam-Webster Logo
  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
  • Medical
  • Scrabble
  • Spanish Central
  • Learner's Dictionary

arrogant

play
adjective ar·ro·gant \ˈer-ə-gənt, ˈa-rə-\

Simple Definition of arrogant

  • : having or showing the insulting attitude of people who believe that they are better, smarter, or more important than other people : having or showing arrogance

Full Definition of arrogant

  1. 1 :  exaggerating or disposed to exaggerate one's own worth or importance often by an overbearing manner <an arrogant official>

  2. 2 :  showing an offensive attitude of superiority :  proceeding from or characterized by arrogance <an arrogant reply>

ar·ro·gant·ly adverb

Examples of arrogant

  1. Tim Blixseth, the founder of the Yellowstone Club and other gated hideaways, tells Frank: “I don't like most rich people. They can be arrogant.” This from a man who owns two Shih Tzus named Learjet and G2. —Alex Beam, New York Times Book Review, 10 June 2007

  2. Arrogant execs are not the only targets of investors' ire. … There's no telling how much money analysts such as Meeker cost investors with their interminable buy recommendations on Internet stocks that eventually went bust. —Marcia Vickers et al., Business Week, 25 Feb. 2002

  3. Despite her social and business status in Washington, Graham remained unassuming and down to earth. Her quiet but steady courage affirmed women such as Geneva Overhosler, a former editor and Post ombudsman, by showing a woman could be powerful without being arrogant. —Mark Fitzgerald et al., Editor & Publisher, 23 July 2001

  4. Shakespeare must have known that while his audiences loved to see villains punished and arrogant young men humbled, they did not want to fidget and squirm through mea culpas before the final scene. —Elaine Showalter, Civilization, April/May 1999

  5. She's first in her class, but she's not arrogant about it.

  6. <the arrogant young lawyer elbowed his way to the head of the line of customers, declaring that he was too busy to wait like everybody else>



Origin of arrogant

Middle English, from Latin arrogant-, arrogans, present participle of arrogare (see arrogate)


First Known Use: 14th century

Synonym Discussion of arrogant

proud, arrogant, haughty, lordly, insolent, overbearing, supercilious, disdainful mean showing scorn for inferiors. proud may suggest an assumed superiority or loftiness <too proud to take charity>. arrogant implies a claiming for oneself of more consideration or importance than is warranted <a conceited and arrogant executive>. haughty suggests a consciousness of superior birth or position <a haughty aristocrat>. lordly implies pomposity or an arrogant display of power <a lordly condescension>. insolent implies contemptuous haughtiness <ignored by an insolent waiter>. overbearing suggests a tyrannical manner or an intolerable insolence <an overbearing supervisor>. supercilious implies a cool, patronizing haughtiness <an aloof and supercilious manner>. disdainful suggests a more active and openly scornful superciliousness <disdainful of their social inferiors>.


Seen and Heard

What made you want to look up arrogant? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

February 7, 2016

a slight offense

Get Word of the Day daily email!

WORD GAMES

Take a 3-minute break and test your skills!

image1037863653

Which of the following refers to thin, bending ice, or to the act of running over such ice?

duvet pince-nez spindrift kittly-benders
Name That Thing

10 quick questions: hear them, spell them, and see how your skills compare to the crowd.

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ