propositional attitude


propositional attitude

Psychological state expressed by a verb that may take a subordinate clause beginning with “that” as its complement. Verbs such as “believe,” “hope,” “fear,” “desire,” “intend,” and “know” all express propositional attitudes. The linguistic contexts created by their use are typically referentially opaque (see intentionality) in the sense that the substitution of co-referential expressions within them may change the “truth value” (true or false) of the containing sentence. Thus, to use Bertrand Russell's example, though it is true that Peter believes that Walter Scott was a Scotsman, it may be false that he believes that the author of Waverley (who is Scott) was a Scotsman.

This entry comes from Encyclopædia Britannica Concise.
For the full entry on propositional attitude, visit Britannica.com.

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