New Realism


New Realism

Early 20th-century movement in metaphysics and epistemology that opposed the idealism dominant in British and U.S. universities. Early leaders included William James, Bertrand Russell, and G. E. Moore, who adopted the term realism to signal their opposition to idealism. In 1910 William Pepperel Montague, Ralph Barton Perry, and others signed an article entitled “The Program and First Platform of Six Realists,” and followed it with a cooperative volume, The New Realism (1912). In defending the independence of known things, New Realism affirmed that in cognition “the content of knowledge, that which lies in or before the mind when knowledge takes place, is numerically identical with the thing known” (a form of direct realism). To some realists, this epistemological monism seemed unable to give a satisfactory explanation of the mind's proneness to error.

This entry comes from Encyclopædia Britannica Concise.
For the full entry on New Realism, visit Britannica.com.

Seen & Heard

What made you look up New Realism? Please tell us what you were reading, watching or discussing that led you here.