high-speed steel


high-speed steel

Alloy of steel introduced in 1900. It doubled or trebled the capacities of machine shops by permitting the operation of machine tools at twice or three times the speeds possible with carbon steel (which loses its cutting edge when the temperature produced by the friction of the cutting action is above about 400°F, or 210°C). A common type of high-speed steel contains 18% tungsten, 4% chromium, 1% vanadium, and only 0.5–0.8% carbon. See also heat treating, stainless steel.

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