carbide


carbide

Inorganic compound, any of a class of chemical compounds in which carbon is combined with a metal or semimetallic element. The nature of the second element (its position in the periodic table) determines the carbide's type of bonding and its properties. Calcium carbide is useful as a source of acetylene. Carbides of tungsten, silicon (see Carborundum), and boron, called refractory carbides, are extremely hard, remain stable when heated, and have a high melting point and chemical resistance. They are used as abrasives and in cutting tools, as furnace linings, and in other high-temperature applications. Iron carbide (cementite) is an important constituent of steel and cast iron.

This entry comes from Encyclopædia Britannica Concise.
For the full entry on carbide, visit Britannica.com.

Seen & Heard

What made you look up carbide? Please tell us what you were reading, watching or discussing that led you here.